OnRecord can be at the heart of your strategy for meeting your pastoral responsibilities

OnRecord is ideal for gathering evidence and improving communication about issues and concerns affecting children, families and staff, making records immediately available to those with responsibility to respond.

 

How OnRecord can promote communication and provide an ideal way of recording issues relevant to pastoral care.

On Record would like to work with schools to create a bespoke reporting service which would gather reports of bullying and other pastoral care issues, together with supporting evidence.

Some of the issues to be addressed in order to provide a service you will find really useful and which can be adopted nationwide:

  • Who you will allow to provide records – children, parents, teachers, social workers, wider members of the community etc. and will you allow anonymous reporting?
  • What will the OnRecord mobile app prompt users to record e.g. When, What, Who, Where and With what result?  What evidence can be uploaded?
  • What will you want to include in the record of action taken?
  • What will you want to include in the record of outcome and effectiveness of action taken?
  • How you want the records to be presented to establish patterns and the search facility to enable it.
  • How you might discover where the bullying hot spots are in your school to help you make changes to the environment or to your strategies that target these areas.
  • How you will want to set up the timings of records so you can consider the experience of pupils in break and lunch times and throughout the day in the classrooms and at sports.
  • The way to set up recordings of bullying or other issues on the way to and from school in the streets or on transport.
  • How to make a link to your safeguarding policy for when you might need to escalate a bullying incident to the police or children’s services

Bullying: background

Focus on: Bullying, a report from the Anti-Bullying Alliance, hosted by National Children’s Bureau, by Peter K Smith, Emeritus Professor of Psychology, Unit of School and Family Studies, Goldsmiths College includes the following paragraphs:

‘In England, the DfE issued revised guidance on Preventing and tackling bullying in October 2014, covering legal requirements, stating that ‘Teachers have the power to discipline pupils for misbehaving outside the school premises “to such an extent as is reasonable”’, and that ‘Schools should apply disciplinary measures to pupils who bully in order to show clearly that their behaviour is wrong’. The 2014 revision expanded the definition of bullying in an earlier 2012 version, to include acknowledgement that “Many experts say that bullying involves an imbalance of power between the perpetrator and the victim”.’

‘The Ofsted framework for school inspection asks inspectors to consider ‘freedom from bullying and harassment that may include cyber-bullying and prejudice-based bullying related to special educational need, sexual orientation, sex, race, religion and belief, gender reassignment or disability.’

‘In its guide for school governors, the Anti-Bullying Alliance recommends that schools have a system to record all bullying incidents, including action taken following an incident and the outcome. In a survey of 56 schools in the UK, Ofsted found a wide variety of practice in recording methods. When kept, incident records often recorded who was involved and where, and gave some indication of the action taken, but there was often little attention paid to the types of bullying that occurred, or to following up the initial action taken and whether it was effective.’

Benton, T. (2011). Sticks and stones may break my bones, but being left on my own is worse: states ‘A survey of over 11,000 secondary pupils in England and Wales reported that 11% said they had been bullied a lot and 33% sometimes. Of those bullied, 88% reported it happening in school, also 31% out of school, 15% in cyberspace, 13% on mobile phone, and 15% on the journey to/from school.’

A survey in 2015 of over 11,000 secondary pupils in England and Wales13 reported that 11% said they had been bullied a lot and 33% sometimes. Of those bullied, 88% reported it happening in school, also 31% out of school, 15% in cyberspace, 13% on mobile phone, and 15% on the journey to/from school.